29 06, 2021

Adapting Testimonies of Survivors of Mass Atrocity Crimes for Performance: A Law and Drama Approach

By | June 29th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Agata Fijalkowski (Leeds Beckett University) and Jane Arnfield (Northumbria University)   Radegast Station Independence Traditions Museum Lodz Poland - Project Ten To Ten 2019 Blueprint Banners by Alfons Bytautus & Jane Arnfield commissioned by Marek Edelman Dialogue Centre Lodz for the commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto. Photograph Credit Tony Harrington. [...]

7 06, 2021

Bangladesh at Fifty: The Quest for Penal Reform

By | June 7th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Hussain Bari, University of Sheffield In 1971, Bangladesh achieved independence in its quest for equality, human dignity and social justice. In the light of those principles, freedom-loving people were embellished with a robust constitution which specifically offers a catalogue of fundamental rights, including the right to fair trial and a cluster of procedural due process [...]

24 05, 2021

The “Mountains of Metaphor”: A Resource for Visualising Your Research Journey

By | May 24th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Clare Williams, University of Kent (@_clare_williams) Figure 1: Mapping a metaphorical journey, copyright Clare Williams, reproduced with kind permission of tl;dr.legal   Deadline anxiety? Rushing to catch up with research? Extra pressure from imagining where you should be now? This post is for you. How would you describe your research journey? Not your topic [...]

19 05, 2021

Religion and Marriage Law: The Need for Reform

By | May 19th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Russell Sandberg, Cardiff University (@sandbergrlaw) Last summer when the initial COVID restrictions were beginning to be relaxed, provisions allowing gatherings for the purpose of the solemnisation of marriage proved problematic. This was because a number of weddings were not covered by such provisions. A number of people have weddings that do not comply with [...]

4 05, 2021

Birth Rights & COVID-19: Socio-Legal Reflections on Changing Choices and Increasing Restriction

By | May 4th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Elizabeth Chloe Romanis (@ECRomanis) & Anna Nelson (@Anna_Nelson95) In the previous post in this series we provided an overview of the socio-legal gap that exists between the legal principle that pregnant people have a right to make choices about childbirth and the reality of the contemporary socio-legal context, which means it is difficult for this right to be [...]

4 05, 2021

Birth Rights & COVID-19: Changing Choices and Increasing Restriction

By | May 4th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Elizabeth Chloe Romanis (@ECRomanis) & Anna Nelson The second of our COVID-19 birthing workshops focused on the ways in which birthing preferences of pregnant people may have changed in response to the crisis, and the extent to which birthing preferences were respected during COVID-19. The aim was to understand some of the difficulties pregnant people preparing to [...]

26 04, 2021

Birth Rights & COVID-19: Socio-Legal Reflections on the Problem of Unconsented Vaginal Examinations

By | April 26th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Anna Nelson (@Anna_Nelson95) & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis (@ECRomanis) In the previous post in this series we provided an overview of the problem of unconsented vaginal examinations during labour and reflected briefly on some of the key discussions and themes which emerged during our workshop.  In this blog, we explore each of the three key themes in more [...]

26 04, 2021

Birth Rights & COVID-19: The Problem of Unconsented Vaginal Examinations

By | April 26th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Anna Nelson (@Anna_Nelson95) & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis (@ECRomanis) COVID-19 had a huge (somewhat inevitable) impact on all medical services. It was alarming, however, how quickly changes were made to pregnancy and birthing services such that the rights and protections that should be afforded to pregnant people were disregarded. A number of issues in care provision that were [...]

13 04, 2021

Diversity in the legal profession: Another landmark reached but still a long way to go

By | April 13th, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Charlotte Harrison, University of Portsmouth and James Hand, University of Portsmouth This year’s ‘Silks’ day (15 March 2021) saw the 500th woman barrister to be appointed Queen’s Counsel, 72 years after the first. At 34%, it also sees by far the largest proportion of women to be appointed as one of Her Majesty’s Counsel learned [...]

31 03, 2021

Census Day, 21 March 2021: A reflection on documents, bureaucracy, and the everyday

By | March 31st, 2021|Categories: Blog Posts|0 Comments

By Jessica Smith, University of Kent The UK’s 2021 census has been described as a ‘snapshot’ of pandemic life. But what sort of visual is this snapshot? An advert accompanying the roll-out of the census illustrated how, in the words of the government, ‘the census builds a picture of your community’ which helps to inform [...]